Commemorating
Charles Dawson Brown
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West Kirby Museum

Mission Statement
To preserve and display the collection of artefacts covering 1000 years of history of St Bridget's church and to promote knowledge and understanding of the museum, the church and local history.

St Bridget's School History

St Bridget's School was known as West Kirby National School during the nineteenth century. From 1825 to 1900 the school was located on four different sites.

In 1825 The West Kirby National School opened in a room adjoining St Bridget's church tower. West Kirby was a rural community and it is likely that the few pupils were children of farmers and farm labourers.

St BridgetsThe building was demolished in 1848 and a new school was built on land close to the church. The outer offices house the present museum. Two former doorways, possibly marked Boys and Girls, are visible on the outside of the building.

In 1864 the pupils transferred to Grange School, situated on the other side of Grange Hill, and which was later known as the Grammar School. The school at St Bridget's became used as a Sunday School and meeting room

In 1885 the scholars transferred back to a new brick-built school by St Bridget's church, which had two turrets and a bell tower.

In 1965 work began on a new school on the same site. The final phase was completed in 1968 and remains very much as you see it today. The old sandstone school building was used as a canteen in the 1950s and 60s, and it was an additional classroom until recently.

The Charles Dawson Brown museum had been created in the hearse-house next to the old school building, and remained a permanently-locked door visible to any children in the cloak room.

There is more to learn about the history of St Bridget's School at the museum.